PREPARING FOR AN HPDE EVENT

Suggestions on Things to do 2 Weeks Before an Event – Prepared by former Hooked on Driving owner Don Clinkinbeard

Clean your car up. Windows, paint, engine compartment. Make sure the brake fluid is fresh. The highest frequency failure we get at the track is boiled brake fluid because it was not fresh. The rain in the Pacific Northwest contributes to this as brake fluid absorbs water and that reduces the boiling point of the fluid. Ensure that your car has a current annual inspection and you have turned it in to us or you have a hard copy to bring with you to the track.

Perform all necessary maintenance. This is not the time to defer maintenance. You are going to be driving your car at the edge of its operating envelope and having it in tip top shape is the best way to ensure you will have a good time free from mechanical failures. This is also a good time to go through your car and remove any articles which will not be required while driving and to secure or remove items like telephones, radar detectors etc. Also make sure your battery, spare tire and jack are secured.

WHAT TO BRING

Food and Fluid. Hooked on Driving events are held at three venues; Portland International Raceway, Oregon Raceway Park and the Ridge Motorsports Park.  At any of these venues, you are welcome to bring your own refreshments (water is good) and food along.

Dress comfortably for the weather. It can be cold or hot, wet or dry. It’s suggested that only cotton (or natural fiber) shirts and pants are appropriate for drivers. Cotton wicks water away from the skin effectively and helps keep you cool in the hot weather. Driving gloves and comfortable rubber soled shoes are recommended. Please no high heels, sandals or heavy soled shoes or boots. You need to be able to feel the pedals through the footwear.

Be sure to bring lots of water and sunscreen. For a sunny or rainy days a popup cover is a good thing to invest in. A comfortable chair is also a good thing to bring.

An extra quart or two of your cars engine oil. A jack, stands, and some basic tools are also advisable, but not necessary. A good quality tire pressure gauge. Get one with a dial or digital readout and a bleeder button to help you reset tire pressures easily. Most of the time you have to let air out of your tires rather than adding. There is usually compressed air available in the paddock.

Something to store the stuff from your car that you want to keep dry is also a good idea.  Plastic storage boxes work well.